Tony Yayo compares Katt Williams' interview to Tupac's "Hit 'Em Up" and describe him as 50 Cent of comedy

Tony Yayo, a rapper and member of G-Unit, recently compared Katt Williams' interview to Tupac's "Hit 'Em Up" in an interview with Club Shay Shay. 

Wireless Festival 2023 - Day 3
Wireless Festival 2023 - Day 3 / Joseph Okpako/GettyImages
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Tony Yayo, who has been in the hip-hop industry for over a decade, recently shared his thoughts on Katt Williams' interview with Club Shay Shay. According to Yayo, the interview was reminiscent of Tupac's "Hit 'Em Up," a diss track that was aimed at several rappers in the 90s.

In the interview, Williams spoke candidly about his career, his personal life, and his views on the current state of the entertainment industry. Yayo praised Williams for his honesty and said that the interview was a breath of fresh air in an industry that is often plagued by fake personas and manufactured images.

Yayo's comparison to "Hit 'Em Up" is not unwarranted. The song, which was released in 1996, was a scathing diss track aimed at several rappers, including The Notorious B.I.G. and his crew. The song was widely regarded as one of the most brutal diss tracks of all time and helped to cement Tupac's status as one of the greatest rappers of all time.

Williams' interview, while not a diss track, was similarly unapologetic and honest. Williams spoke candidly about his struggles with addiction, his views on the entertainment industry, and his personal life. The interview was widely praised by fans and critics alike for its honesty and authenticity.

Watch the full interview below

The Club Shay Shay interview featuring Katt Williams has amassed more than 37 million views since it was published. In the course of the conversation, Williams critiques various comedians, including Tiffany Haddish and Kevin Hart, questioning their comedic skills. Additionally, he takes jabs at Diddy and several other individuals during the discussion.

Tony Yayo's comparison of Katt Williams' interview to Tupac's "Hit 'Em Up" is not unfounded. Both the interview and the song were unapologetic and honest, and both have been widely praised for their authenticity. Williams' interview was a breath of fresh air in an industry that is often plagued by fake personas and manufactured images, and it is a testament to his talent and his commitment to his craft.

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